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    Experts on TikTok Praise Bed Rest Trend – Here’s Why it’s Encouraged

    Sleep scientist and PhD candidate Vanessa Hill explains in the video above, ‘There’s a new trend called bed rotting, and it’s actually perfect. Bed rotting is when they do literally nothing but lay in bed. It’s the end of optimization, and anti-productivity because you are wasting away under a blanket and the nothingness is your best life. I’m a sleep scientist who fact-checks a lot of trends, and I’m here to tell you that bed rotting is 100% backed by science.’
    Just sink into your sheets and stay there. Some outlets are challenging this beautiful trend asking, ‘Is it really self-care, or could it mess with your sleep?’ And to them, I say, ‘Just let the people rot.’ You’re allowed to live life under a blanket — rest and be soft. I’m not accepting questions at this time,” she concludes in her TikTok.
    A person peeking at their phone from underneath their blanket
    BuzzFeed spoke to Hill, who said her area of expertise is sleep habits, and her research focuses on bedtime procrastination. When talking about bed rotting, she said, ‘In a world of hustle culture and productivity hacks, there is shame associated with rest and ‘doing nothing.’ Giving yourself permission to rest without feeling guilty is an act of self-compassion. Self-compassion is linked to better physical and mental health and can lead to better sleep quality.’
    Vanessa Hill sitting on a chair surrounded by potted plants with a dog in the foreground
    Hill believes that trends like bed rotting give people permission to rest and recharge when they may otherwise feel pressured to be productive or socialize. However, she also notes that like with anything, it may not be the right activity for every single person. So we reached out to one other expert to get the low-down on bed rotting and any potential impacts it could have on mental health. Remember: Health is never a ‘one size fits all’ and it’s always best to speak to your own doctor if you have any concerns.
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    So, to learn more about bed rotting and mental health, we also spoke to Helene D’Jay, MS, LPC who is the executive director of young adult services at Newport Healthcare.
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    When it comes to mental health, D’Jay shared that bed rotting can have a detrimental effect on individuals and may serve as a telltale sign of psychological distress. According to her, individuals might resort to extensive periods of bed rest as a means to evade reality and seek solace. Activities such as binge-watching TV shows or endlessly scrolling through social media platforms often serve as an escape mechanism for these individuals.
    One person said, "Today I found out my depressive episode all through high school and college was a cool hip trend"
    And D’Jay cautions that the bed rotting trend can be especially risky for those currently struggling with depression. Engaging in bed rotting can exacerbate symptoms and contribute to a cycle of negative emotions and behaviors.
    A woman sitting and looking forlorn
    But, in general, both experts agree it is all about balance. “’Healthy’ bed rotting would be intentional rest for rejuvenation, self-care, and body-nourishing sleep. Non-healthy bed rotting is prolonged inactivity, social withdrawal, and loss of interest, and is more often associated with mental health issues,” said D’Jay.
    So many of us are tired because we feel pressured to ‘do it all.’ Trends like bed rotting aren’t about wasting your days away in bed — they’re about allowing yourself to do less, and telling you that doing less is okay. Of course, spending all day, every day in bed will have a negative impact on your mental and physical health. Bed rotting isn’t about disrupting the balance of your health. It’s a mental shift to prioritize rest and stress management because these are underrated foundations of our well-being.
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    The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. Other international suicide helplines can be found at befrienders.org. You can also text TALK to 741741 for free, anonymous 24/7 crisis support in the US from the Crisis Text Line.

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